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harry reid warned it will be tough to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff before christmas. we all note deadline, december 31. take a look at how we're finishing the day. the dow jones industrial average up about 80 points today. it was higher, much higher than 100 points earlier today, up two-thirds of 1%. volume on the light side this afternoon. nasdaq composite picked it up. technology up better than 1%. s&p 500 also on the upswing. markets maintaining steady gains all day long. david kudlow and bob pisani and barbara from the street. welcome to all of you. what about coming off the best levels? >> hitting search-week highs. 13,245 is where we ended the night of election and waiting for it to settle out. 13,248, so we are exactly where we were when the elections closed. i think the important thing is as long as there is some indication that they are talking the markets are holding up very well. i think the concern is after a deal happens, i think we'll have it, what will happen after, that and a lot of people are worried now that austerity is coming. that's a negative for stocks
to hear from somebody who says a deal on the fiscal cliff could have already been reached if only lawmakers took a page out of wall street's deal making strategy of keeping things behind closed doors. where have we heard that before? >>> plus, secretary tim geithner with us exclusively. will the white house let our economy go over the fiscal cliff if a deal on higher tax rates for the wealthy is not reached? we're checking it out. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >>> welcome back. this very public negotiation on the fiscal cliff still does not seem to be closing in on a deal. the white house out in campaign style events regularly, mak
a fiscal cliff deal. >> i think the atmospherics are getting so much better. we've gotten out after ka bookie theater and gone to dancing the tango with those two guys. any time you start to tango, you have a chance. >> chances of getting it done now are better. i think that's what's key. >> part of that tango is republicans cracking on tax rates. that's what president obama will be talking about in michigan today. keeping the public pressure on. but the part for the administrator point of view, tyler, is what do they live john boehner so he can bring his troops along, entitlement, spending cuts, to tell their members we got a good deal. >> john, i find it curious to find that president spent as much time as he has on the road trying to drum up support for this deal. we just had an election all about this. why does not white house figure that these kinds of appearances are helpful when both sides positions are pretty well locked in already? >> because this president and this white house have concluded that public pressure is what will make republicans bargain with him and deal on his t
the fiscal cliff deal very closely and they continue to move higher. that is the interesting part. do the big investors miss something. i say the markets should be optimistic. we are going to ask an expert next up. i'm larry kudlow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-3
on the on the missile that perhaps we are nearing a fiscal cliff deal. coming up we'll, find out from key lawmakers in the fiscal cliff negotiations how we can actually get a deal done before the deadline. representative chris van hollen, lynn jenkins and javier becerra as well as sore orrin hatch with us. we'll hear from former treasury secretary altman and jeff greenfield. bill? >> stocks are trading off the highs of the day with less than an hour to go. final hour, really from the get-go. optimism about the cliff talks and senator harry reid made some comments this afternoon that put a damper on that real. we've lost about 30 points. in that time. up 74 on the dow at 13,244. the nasdaq is doing well today, up 32 points. more than a 1% gain, although it is off its highs of the day at 3019, and the s&p 500 index is 8 plus points at 1426. the word on the street is because of the fiscal cliff, some investors are actually selling the winners, the winning stocks, and they are holding on to the poor performers, the opposite what have they have been doing the last few years. maria? >> makes a lot of sen
very much for helping us out. >>> now folks, we switch gears back. we still have no fiscal cliff deal, but there's talk between president obama and tim geithner. congress has adjourned for a long weekend. that's kind of insane. eamon javers joins us. >> reporter: the president began his day this morning before an audience of business leaders and he continued his campaign of persuasion amongst some of the nation's top ceos. >> i am passionately rooting for your success. because if the companies in this room are doing well, then small businesses and medium sized businesses up and down the chain are doing well. if companies in this room are doing well, then folks get jobs, consumers get confidence, and we're going to be able to compete around the world. >> and then larry, later in the afternoon, our steve leishman sat down with treasury secretary tim geithner. geithner in that interview late in the afternoon made it clear that this is brinksmanship of the highest order. >> i want to understand the administration's position when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy. those making more
if you get a fiscal cliff deal, it will be mildly inflationary. that may actually raise rates, even if the fed keeps buying bonds. we actually need to see rates up in order to get real excited about the banks. >> that's a good point. we continue to watch facebook. flirting with 28. and apple here at $5.40. we'll see how it manages that resistance. bob pisani is on the floor with more. >> still talking about the fiscal cliff and how little reaction we'll get with the markets. up 60 points in the dow right now. there's no particular worry out there. they believe that a deal is going to happen. if you look at the vix, for example, not only are they not moving, they're not moving out of any range, but they're moving in an even tighter spread than they normally do. the relationship between vix and vix futures is squashed down. this is the deal, the republicans will agree to tax increases, and very quickly this week we'll turn to debate on what kind of spending cuts there's going to be, and dealing with entitlements. they believe a deal is coming, we'll see. i espoused this a couple of we
to look for some kind of a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> some kind being the operative words. hello everyone, again. maria is going to be back tomorrow but in the meantime you're stuck with me. let's see what the markets are up to today. the dow holding marginally above water. as for the nasdaq and the s&p, let's get a check on those two as well. they've been kind of positive today, but not superbly so. at least it is a positive start to the trading week. >> now, forget about the number of days -- shopping days until christmas. we're talking about 13 and a half trading days after today how to position your money ahead of what might or might not happen with the fiscal cliff deal. are we ready to go? let's find out how you should be investing. everybody's looking at me like i should not be saying something right now. okay. everybody's there. mandy? >> okay. joining us now we have a cast of thousands. dan mcmahon from raymond james. nathan backrat. and our very own rick santelli. thank you for joining us today. nathan, let's start with you. so 13 and a half trading days left. what do y
. >>> let's see where we do stand on the fiscal cliff deal. let's look at our "rise above" meter. time to stop talking and start actle. we were at a half-way point, now back to a quarter on the "rise above" meter, closing to no deal than deal. >>> lawmakers trying to solve the fiscal cliff issue. police trying to solve a burglary at the home of california congressman darrel issa. according to reports, more than 50 pieces of jewelry worth about $100,000 were stolen from the congressman's home on november 29th. watches, earrings, rings, bracelets involved and what issa spokesperson calls irreplaceable family air looms. >>> to the jobs report today. super storm sandy slammed the east coast but it looks like it didn't have all that much impact on the labor market. november jobs numbers coming in much stronger than expected. steve leisman who's had a very busy week here to talk about the numbers and put it in context for us. >> hi, sue. no substantive sandy in the jobs numbers. the lack of sandy effect has us scratching our heads, what they said. i just got off the phone with the guy who's
and counting away from the fiscal cliff, but are we any closer to a deal than we were yesterday? eamon javers is in washington making a career out of this story. he's got the latest on the negotiations. >> hi, bill. the battle for public perception here in the fiscal cliff fight continues today. the president visiting a middle class family in northern virginia who he said would be hurt by tax increases if those come to pass at the end of this year. the president saying that republicans simply need to come to terms and a deal with him. take a listen to what the president had to say out in the living room of this family in northern virginia. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> so, bill, the president using the power of the bully pulpit there and image making. it's the power the president has to shift the debate here. republicans don't seem to have caved in just yet. we're going t
by senator johnny isakson. back to you guys. >> maria, brian, thank you very much. will a fiscal cliff deal be done in time? why don't you register your opinion. finance.cnbc. cast your vote. results will come up later on "power lunch." sue. >> we have a triple digit rally on the floor of the new york stock exchange with the dow jones industrial just off the highs of the trading session. we're up 109 points on the dow despite the gridlock in washington. nasdaq is up 41 points and s&p 500 is up 13 points. all three of those averages moving back above their 50-day moving average. first time we've seen that since october. trader from cnbc, and ceo of destination wealth management. ken y, i'm going to start with you. you were champing at the bit listening to the interview that was done in washington. why is this market up triple digits? is it up because they think there is a deal or isn't a deal? >> very interesting. i'm beginning to think the market is rallying because there is no deal, we're going over this cliff. let's not forget, it was a bipartisan committee that couldn't come to an agreem
with the decisions? what do americans, average americans, want to see in a fiscal cliff deal? steve leisman here now with our exclusive results of the cnbc all-america economic survey. what do americans want, steve? >> what you would expect. free stuff, tyler. actually, no, we'll get into that in a second. first we want to show you results of our december cnbc all-america survey. what we asked about the fiscal cliff. the first thing we wanted to establish is do people know about this thing? we looked at some of the other times we've asked this. what we'll see right here is other situations where they knew it, where other main stories that were out there. for example, the trayvon martin shooting. 91% of americans knew about that. occupy wall street, 80%. going forward what you have here, facebook, 72%. all the way down to 70%. you can look at this a couple ways. here's the greek financial crisis. 30% of the public not really paying attention to. inside that 70% number, 36% have know a lot about it. we'll compare with other stuff we asked last time about when they had a debt -- big deficit debate. we
pressure as part of a broader fiscal cliff deal. there's an article on the front page of today's "wall street journal" that highlights other ways people are trying to take advantage of the certainty over the final few weeks of 2012. some of the examples they cite are people said to be accelerating large medical expenses for this year and selling appreciated stock in some cases even prepaying their mortgages so they can make sure they get the mortgage interest deduction. and, bob, you think -- for a lot of people that won't matter? >> you have the amt. so if you take excessive deductions, they just disappear. which is one of the things about all of this about limiting these deductions which is kind of silly because the amt does it in the aggregate. and of course the amt is grabbing more and more people and it's one of the things they want to reform, but if they reform it, they have to raise taxes someplace else. so it's confusing. >> but that's the worst part of it, a simpler tax code that someone could actually understand and now how things work that allows less room for loophole so is
could be a big deal for sure. but what could trump the fiscal cliff, study this. it's the need to get out of your mother-in-law's house. get your own home. intuitive concept for those, when you think about it. we got to break here as toll brothers actually down on the news today because the market's so darn tough. i expect downgrades tomorrow from people who don't believe things can stay this strong and that could be your strong to be analysts who always downgrade ar the report. here's the bottom line. we need hope to be vanquished. we need it spindled, mutilated. chex out the holders, thinking it's imminent and leave the room and then return to what i've been tracing and huge cycles of pent-up demand. buy them on the way down. never on the way up. you can take your time. do not leave this market wholesale. who the heck knows when and from what level you can get back in. why don't we go to tom in new york. tom? >> caller: hi, jim. could this offset same-store sales and make it a buy? >> i think it moved already. one of those stocks that moves in gigantic gobs, to speak and had its gob
now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find some civil way to talk to each other, we're going to cut your rating. >> it was nice seeing the ratings agencies make a comments on u.s. democracy. that was helpful. i think, though, is there some deal that can be struck, yes. when does it get done, i think it's probably less important to be better before year
the president told the business round table that a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff could be reached quickly if republicans drop their opposition to raising tax rates on the wealthy. and in an interview on cnbc, timothy geithner says the gop is making a little bit of practice, but the white house is absolutely ready to go over the cliff if tax rates on the top 2% don't rise. >> our obligation is first do no harl. we need to lift that threat over the economy. and now as part of that, we'd like to put in place as i said a carefully designed mix of reforms to put our fiscal balance in the path of sustainability. as long as there is recognition by the other side that those rates will go up, we think we can reach an agreement on the set of reforms as i said that will be good for the economy. >> republicans were quick to hit back. orrin hatch called them stunning and irresponsible, but there may be more cracks in the ranks. "washington post" reports some moderate and conservative republicans are calling on boehner to concede on taxes now while he still has leverage to ask for something in return l
some sort of fiscal cliff deal together. ayman, you've been tweeting this morning already about some characterizations about the discussions between the speaker and the president in recent days. >> that's right. a republican source told nbc news that the conversation that the president and speaker had on the phone yesterday, lasted for only 15 minutes, and they described it as, quote, tense, unquote. and that may have something to do with the fact that the president lowered his request in his latest proposal to the house republicans from $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues to $1.4 trillion. clearly as you can see here, the republicans don't think that's enough. they want the president to come out publicly now with some specific spending cuts. now, there's some question whether or not behind the scenes the president has offered significant spending cuts. the president says yes, the house republicans say no. they say the democrats have taken so much off the table that all that's left there is the varnish. there's clearly a gloomy assessment here in washington, carl. >> ayman, we'll be co
if they are doing their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. good morning again, everybody. i'm becky quick. here is what we know right now. the pace of private talks picking up speed as we now have just 20 days left. however, neither the white house nor house speaker boehner's office are giving any public indication that either side is yet prepared to give up real ground. on a road trip yesterday, president obama indicated that he is willing to compromise, just not on that point about an increase in tax for relthy americans. meantime, speaker boehner says he is still waiting on specific spending cuts. joining us now for analysis, tony fratto, of hamilton place strategies and former white house press secretary and gerald bernstein former economic adviser to vice president joe biden. gentlemen, thank you for being here with us and getting this special day of coverage kicked off for us. >> rising early and rising above. >> exactly. let's talk about this. jared, it seems like things have gotten quieter. do you think that's the case? is that a good sign? >> i t
and small businesses. >> i've got to ask you. we've got a fiscal cliff meeting deal here sitting t 50% that we get a deal done. where would you put it at? >> i'm probably more optimistic about that. i'm probably more in the 60/40 range. the speaker's a good negotiator. i think honestly from position of strength on a lot of these things. i think the president takes his job seriously too. going over the fiscal cliff is not good for anyone. it bothers me sometimes if i hear people on both the left and the right entertain this is something that might be good politics. may be good politics for somebody, but it's bad economics for the american economy and more important for people looking for a job and people trying to hold on to a job. >> last question. i want to go back to the premise that you and other republican members of the house would be willing to allow that top tier tax rate to go higher. you know, speaker boehner's argument all this time is that it doesn't effect just those top-earning americans, but it also effects the small business owners in this country. the job creators in t
are out there on this fiscal cliff story? we seem to feel that there's a deal in the air. why else do we see such optimism today? rick? >> oh, for me? i'm sorry. i'll tell you what, maria, i'm not sure what's going on in washington. i'm not sure who those republicans are. i'm not so sure on whether the fiscal conservatives in the party know something about some big reforms on medicare and medica medicare, social security is, any of the retirement or tax issues, but i'll tell you this. i think that all these stories aren't necessarily going lead us to the truth. i personally have a very size way i'm approaching this. the president is supposed to leave for a 21-day vacation in hawaii on december 17th. where he is on december 18th will tell me, and i think the markets will pay attention. i find it hard to believe, and i agree with bill and many, who are very not amused by the house taking their long weekend. i'm sure that the president would have no intentions of leaving until these issues are resolved. i think the market is being kind, but i think it's a timing issue. >> yeah, i think that
on that in a moment. >> investment banks paralyzed by the fiscal cliff. we'll find out what it will take to get deals going once again. >> we expect the president to speak on the fiscal cliff before the business roundtable. we'll bring you his comments live. citigroup cutting 11,000 jobs taking a billion dollar charge. kayla tausche has more. >> investors see this as a positive. a big move for a new ceo who is just getting his sleeves rolled up. the cuts will span across nearly all of the company's divisions but biggest slice of the pie coming from global consumer banking cutting 6,200 jobs there. the cuts are broad. nearly 2,000 jobs cut from the institutional clients group including investment banking six times the layoffs reported to take place in the securities business earlier this month. jim cramer said earlier that it feels like citigroup has been cutting jobs forever but that's because the bank has downsized by a third since peak employment in 2007. most of that cutting took place after he took the reigns. it will have 261,000 jobs once these cuts are done. the 11,000 announced today is a big
is fretting about the fiscal cliff. until we get a deal. i got more negative when harry reid said it is unlikely that a deal will be done by christmas. i'm thrilled to have senator john hovan, a republican from north dakota who has been an advocate for bipartisan consensus here with us tonight. welcome back to "mad money." >> jim, good to be with you. >> i noticed that you are for a bipartisan situation and one of the things that tells me you are for real is that you have not signed a pledge that would make it so that you can't vote for a tax increase. it should be a big deal on the order of four trillion dollars over ten years. that's what we need to get growth in our economy and the kind of deal that includes tax reform, entitlement reform and better spending control. >> when you were governor of your state you presided over what i think is the single greatest employment boom we've seen. is washington so different that you wish you were back home? >> you have been out to north dakota, you're invited back, but you are right. the fundamentals don't change. let's build that good bu
the administration wants to see a deal come together here. >> for what, the fiscal cliff or the fiscal abyss? >> for both. >> for both. >> so that a down payment -- a compromise down payment on approximately $4 trillion. i think when you pull it apart, you have about a trillion dollars in discretionary spending that has mostly been agreed upon and you have taxes and the entitlements, the mandatory. >> the entitlements are the sticking point. whoa. did you see that? you think that's funny? >> set that up for you. >> you think that's funny, mac? you do this? look at this. this is booby trapped, man. it won't stay up. which can really be a problem. you can laugh at that. it's okay. nobody's watching. it's 6:00 a.m. that got you going. >> when you look through, i guess the devil is in the details in terms of what you're looking at in spending, cuts, entitlement cuts and with the tax increases, and you're right, both sides have put a plan on the table. they're pretty far apart, but at least now you know there's some framework for how you get to the middle. what do you think, 1.2 trillion in tax i
have to leave it there. president obama says no deal on the fiscal cliff. >> how does raising tax rates on the rich help the poor. that is what i don't get. true free market capitalism helps everybody. a rising tide lifts all boats. i'm laugrry kudlow we will be right back. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >> whow does taxing the rich hep the poor rise above poverty and get a job? let's talk to larry elder. he is the author of the great book, "dear father dear son". welcome back. how does taxing successful wealthy people help the poor get out of poverty. well for people who think like i think it doesn't make any sense. but understand something, that is not what
cliff is not the answer. a bipartisan approach in washington to get it done. >> we need a deal. we need to rise above. we have fiscal cliff for what may happen at the end of the year. we need a term for what happens if we get back up. phil fiscal grinds, fiscal ladder. i don't know. >> thank you both for joining us. >>> so much for november's better than expected jobs numbers. the former head of president bush's council of economic advisers says the data may not be all it is cracked up to be. he's next. >>> and then later, laura tyson, former head of president clinton's council of economic advisers will weigh in on that and where things snand d.c. as we get closer to those automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. >>> plus, 401(k) is not okay. some news that might worry everyone who's banking on a 401(k) for their retirement. keep it here to find out more. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education
>>> the clock is running out on the fiscal cliff. i'll talk to the former cabinet secretary who says going over the cliff is better than getting a bad deal. >>> the auto industry is back. what it's doing right in a soft economy? we'll find out what's driving profitability. >>> curtain's up on the billion dollar woman who made the lion roar, julie taymor. >> we never had a complaint about it. >> "the wall street journal report" begins right now. now, maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what's making news. some surprisingly good news about america's economy. the labor department says 146,000 new jobs were created in the month of november. much better than economist's expectations. the unemployment rate dropped two tenth of a% at 7.7%. the labor department also says superstorm sandy had little effect on those numbers. >>> the markets continued their familiar pattern of following the latest word or words or hopes on fiscal cliff. no major moves during the week but several times the market ran out of steam to the end of the trading session. the house of representatives left for a lo
the white house and republicans over the fiscal cliff have ran to something of a holt. john boehner dealing with division in the gop's ranks to his bung budget plan. another shanghai surprise. china's mainland market surge nearly 3%. more austerity. plus, austerity measures are hitting european consumers. retail sales in october fall much more than expected. september also revised sharply to the downside. >>> it was a flat day really for european stocks, slightly negative for u.s. stocks yesterday. we are a little bit higher. the dow is currently some 43 points above fair value. the nasdaq is around four points above fair value. the s&p 500 at the moment is around about four points above fair value. european stocks are up half a percent earlier. we have come off those highs. eurozone pmis a little bit better than expected. but still deeply in contraction territory. uk services pmis dipped weaker than expected. the ftse up a quarter a percent. the ibex up around .2. also dragged down by disappointing retail sales. that's where we stand right now ahead of the u.s. open. what are investors to
we could do is go over the fiscal cliff. we have the same tax rates that we have when bill clinton was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative that the republicans better watch themselves because sometimes it sounds like they are kind of defending rich people. that's their whole mantra, just defending rich people. and i think that's not where they should be. >> i would agree. if i were politically advising the republicans, which i'm certainly not, i
to the fiscal cliff, the longer we delay a deal or can't do a deal at all, it's worse for all the shareholders and the investors and the stock market. yes, a deal that does nothing, it simply keeps taxes where they are right now and doesn't cut entitlements, that's what everybody wants. what does matter, believe he, i mean what's going to happen if we do nothing except keep things exactly the way they are now, and just vote to undo the cliff? the rating agencies, they'll downgrade the u.s. debt. but that's it. by the way, we have already proven through nine ways of sunday that the agencies are ridiculous. when our credit rating got downgraded last summer, well, bonds went up in price and down in yield. so why not do nothing? why doesn't the president say we're just going to keep bonds the way they are? and we're not going to cut entitlements because we know if we don't cut taxes, the republicans will go along with their no tax pledge and the markets will go higher and no one will care, for now. but he told us that's not going to happen, and he got re-elected. why doesn't the president get off
week, another week without a deal to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. while today's positive jobs report did give markets a boost early on, it wasn't enough to get a significant rally going and to continue it on. so what's it going to take to get some conviction back in this market? >> that's in today's "closing bell" exchange. gentlemen, great to have you joining us here on "closing bell." i think bill pretty much cede it. what is it going to take to get conviction back in this market? i kind of know the answer, but i want to hear you guys say it. give it a crack, jim. >> clarity. i think some kind of clarity as to what tax rates are going to be in a mere 3 1/2 weeks. so that we can start is making some kind of plan. right now the market's on hold. we're all waiting. >> do we need just a plan, or does it have to be a good plan, jim? >> i think a good plan would obviously be a better plan. a good plan would be less taxes going up than more taxes going up. at this point, even a bad plan might be better than no plan. >> austin, it's clear from this jobs report the economy is stuck i
dimon. taking about the fiscal cliff. do they expect a deal? their take on what happens if we do go over. my partner sue at the new york stock exchange. my partner sue with big interviewes this hour. >> that's right, ty. i spent the afternoon at blackrock's trading room and i got their outlooks for 2013. you will see it first here on cnbc. >>> here are investment take aways. fixed income. they feel there is danger in what many people consider a safe play. commodities, they have a long view there in many of those sectors. equities is kind of a global shorg an board, if you will. but they like the u.s. best. and in currencies, blackrock is all about being a dollar bull. so where specifically are they putting all that money to work in light of fiscal cliff? take a listen to what bla blackrock's robert casid 0 to me. he manages the firm's $3.7 trillion in assets. >> does this mean we good over the fiscal cliff. >> it is a very high likelihood it does or 11:59 on december 31st with a lot of hoopla. but tax rate are going to go up. there is a going to be a conclusion to this. even if it waits
the fiscal cliff all the time. we know it's a big deal. but maybe there are some signs that it's an even bigger deal at this point. there's a story on the money section of the "usa today" talking about investors peering over the cliff at this point. the markets have kind of hung in. now there is this concern that if there's not some sort of movement, or some signs of movement pretty quickly, maybe the market also react. and then there's also the story on the front page of "the wall street journal" talking about how consumer spending is finally showing some signs of cracks. now we know that when first -- we first saw things starting out right after thanksgiving it was pretty strong sales. now the reports have been more mixed. on friday there was a preliminary measure of consumer sentiment from the university of michigan that showed a big drop after four months of gains. i can't help but wonder if that's because of all the coverage of the fiscal cliff and how much it plays into the news media. at this point maybe that's a sign for washington, guys, hurry up and get something done, because
of washington, will or won't lawmakers reach a budget deal? >>> can investors trade the fiscal cliff or are we going to ride it out for the rest of the year? we'll get one inside perspective, next. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> european markets are firmer right now after thin gains. yesterday, the ftse up near nearly .8el%. and the ibex up nearly .8%. we're pretty much at the high for the year, 52-week high and up nearly 28% for the year. >> much better than you might think with the news flow. >> yeah. >> let's take a quick look at what's on the agenda in the u.s. gap is expected to widen to just over $42 billion. at 10:00, it's october wholesale trade with inventories expected to rise .4%. just one major name, dollar general is due before the opening bell. good read there on the u.s. consumer. here is a quick look at future. up about 48 points for the dow on the team bei
that there might not be a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. all thousand i did hear quite encouraging some of the guys were saying no vacation legislation. they're getting that part of the game plan. after a week's worth of rally in part driven by hopes that the deal could be made. who can blame people for taking profits when the fed chief takes action spurred in mind because the man who invented the fiscal cliff seems to think the odds are high here we're going of it. there's always a constituency unhappy at any bold action. we heard the fed's actions were reckless, feckless, irresponsibility. other concerns that things might be far worse than we think. the fed has given up on any chance that our leaders will rise above this morass. i think bernanke is the only grown up in the whoa town. he wants to get a deal to balance the budget longer term in order to get the economy going now. you know he can't do anything to get a deal himself. so he's giving us the beflt alternative he's got out there to the ridiculous partisanship. entitlement spending. it's all necessary if we're going to have lo
on wall street modestly higher today i did spite no sign of a deal on the fiscal cliff. take a look how we're settling out this thursday afternoon on wall street. the industrial average at 13,074. the s&p up just a fraction. will the markets get a boost from another cash infusion? ben pace says he's expecting the federal reserve to announce another round of stimulus at the meeting next week. is that what the markets really want right now? ben pace joins me along with chris heize and rick santelli. ben, let's talk fed policy. you think the fed announces qe-4 next week? >> i think it's the fact the twist operation is ending at the ends of the year, and they don't feel compelled to incrementally tighten that. that means it has to be replaced. that's the qe-4, the fact they'll continue to buy to continue to be just as easy as they've been since the september 16th qe- 3 announcement. >> so you think it's a continuation. what's the impact on the market, do you think? is it priced in? are we expecting that? what do you think? >> i think it's generally priced in. the thing that concerns me the mos
concerned are you that markets will have to tank in order to get lawmakers to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff, and what do you make of the recent complacency? is there a wall street/washington disconnect? >> interesting question. well, i certainly hope that markets won't have to tank. i don't -- we want to have confidence, not just in markets but in businesses and households as well, and the best way the fiscal policy-makers can achieve that is by coming to a solution as quickly as possible. markets have obviously already responded to some extent, up and down. can you see from day to day how they respond to news about the negotiations. but, on the other hand, it's also true, if you look at experience, i think very informative experience of the debt limit debate in august of 2011, that both confidence and markets remain pretty sanguine up to pretty close to the point where it looked like there was actually a chance tat debt limit would not be raised. and then, of course, there was a pretty sharp shock particularly to confidence about the time of the -- you know, of the final debates so i
on the fiscal cliff before we hit it. represents tim walls is a democrat from minnesota who filed a petition yesterday to force a vote on extending tax cuts for the middle class. congressman, good to have you with us. >> thanks for having me. >> i have to say that the optic beioptics of congressman leaving the capitol right now for another long weekend is extraordinary poor. it is disappointing and to many it is outraging. what do you say? >> i think it is outrageous. i couldn't agree with you more on that. these are good folks. each one of us was elected to represent 650,000 people. i heard it -- i think everyone of the other floor members heard it -- they're tired of the bickering, they're tired of the cliff talk. they want to us compromise and get something done. i proposed yesterday let's find the xron ground. we all agree that tax rates should not go up on folks make makeing $250,000 or less. a family. >> when congress goes home today for a long weekend, who pays for the travel? >> the taxpayers pay for it. they just flew us out on monday. we took two votes. we didn't vote until 6:30 th
until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succeeded or budged off that attempt so far which is why john boehner came out in a news conference today and slammed the white house for not being willing to compromise. >> four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counter offer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> a few hours later you had a slight indication of flexibility from the administration. vice president joe biden was out. he reiterated those two nonnegotiable demands on the part of the administration but said the actual amount of that top rat
before the best deal the middle class in this country is going to get is if we go over the fiscal cliff. here's what will happen if we don't. here's what the compromise will do. there will be a small tax increase on people who could pay more. there will be no tax increase on middle class people fine in the short run and not long run because we can't about the budget without tax increases. the pentagon will get more money. this is note a good deal -- when -- i'll tell you what happens in the deal. the republicans get a good deal, the democrats are going to get a good deal, and the american people get screwed once again. this is not the right way to do it. we need to deal with the deficit now. this will take a big $4 trillion -- $7.3 trillion over ten years bite out of deficit. that is a significant amount of money. we have to stop kicking the can down the road. the politicians made a deal. now they should stick to it. >> it feels like we're going to be in for a significant period of real austerity like we haven't felt in decades. >> this is not real austerity. >> we've had the worst econ
is happening because people have looked over the fiscal cliff and weren't terrified by what they saw. i hope they don't mind government intervention. because they are not going away. i hope that because what i heard in washington today were two sides even though i can tell them that a deal would be done and there would be no vacation without legislation, we'd be in much better shape. i have to tell you, the situation in washington is as discouraging. one after another i started with a too tack. i said let's go there. i said i totally agree the issue of spending not revenues. tell us what you have done to get spending done. did they give you the fellow traveler ideas? no. they attacked the president. each time when i asked for ideas on what to cut. like right now. like every other country in the north does, like pulling back on positions from our army. i got the same response. it is the president's fault. i might have well have been a mannequin. they he want to talk about raising taxes of the rich. but it can't be dismissed as part of the mosaic that will get the government out of the commiss
cliff tax hikes. where's the largic of this position or is it just hypocritical sweetheart deal stuff? >> i don't agree it's a tax killer. the taxes are put into place that the sectors of health care benefit reform, insurers, hospital, medical device companies hoar going to see gain when you have 30 million americans going into the health care system that they also help keep the law sustainable. >> but, wait, i don't understand. we're talking about taxes. come back to the main point. the main point is why are these 18 democrats suddenly opposed to a job killing tax, particularly elizabeth warren, particularly al franken, who are two lefty liberals who love high taxes. is it because, a, they've seen the logic of supply side economics or, b, they're hypocrites because they're just trying to protect their own companies in their own states? >> they have the medical device lobby in their back yard, that's who they're listening to. if they don't want to do this tax, bits $30 billion over ten years to fund the health care expansion, they should find $30 billion of new revenue. if we keep the
to avoid the fiscal cliff. president obama says he expects a deal before the year is out. and both sides traded offers yesterday. the markets are watching every move. >>> today is decision day for the fed. central bank announced another round of bond buying. we look ahead to the news conference with ben bernanke. >>> and michigan's governor makes history, turning a one-time union powerhouse
, the fiscal cliff, the dividend tax rate, a power company ceo will tell us about his biggest concern if a deal doesn't get done by the end of the year. >>> also, what the ceo of walmart thinks about that, as well. he had really explosive data. mike duke last night. we'll bring it to you. "squawk box" is coming back. what's next? he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased spe
, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance it will not happen. it's not exactly confidence building. >> not necessarily confidence building. always interesting to me how people can put percentage chances on anything like this. seeing how difficult it is and how the story changes to a certain steextent each day. who knows what's going to happen. >> public care, confidence numbers, spending, any relationship to the fiscal cliff at five. >> i don't know. i just don't know. i think anecdotally, from what i have been able to observe, no. but i can't speak for that. the journal today has the lead stories of consumer spending starting so slow. and in part, they cite the fiscal cliff. i think if you were out there, you would get answers that would not necessarily describe it correctly. >> it's a shame it's called fiscal cliff. and called radical tax increase. it was m
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
growth. the fiscal cliff still looming. new survey finds more than half of leading investment professionals expect a deal, though, before year end. but it's their opinions on what happens if a compromise isn't reached that is troubling. and sec warning to netflix raising questions about how
the optimists think if we can get beyond the fiscal cliff it will be positive. but we have to get a long-term budget deficit deal done or we'll continue to be in the slow growth type of economy. >> it's clear everything wants the confidence going forward. when it comes to how they might react to any pressure in the near term, can you explain, you know, whether it's cutting back on capital spending or cutting back on hiring? how companies are taking these decisions into account. it's been one area of uncertainty lately. we've seen stronger payroll despite pullback in capital spending. is the outlook likely to be consistent with that? >> you know, again, i think we're sitting right on the precipice here. we've done this survey year in and year out for a number of years. we also do a cash indicator. i actually see some of this underlying optimism in this survey if congress and the administration can get their act together here. and i think that even in our survey, we looked at the first half of '13 being slow and then the second half picking up. so there is a lot of possibility here that we
is with the fiscal cliff looming to the point where it's now mainstream that your take-home pay is going to be reduced by a shocking amount in one month if there's no deal. things ain't getting better. which is why this lulu lemmon number yesterday was astounding. it's so astounding. we have to go through the usual rigamarole to see it, though. first they had a spectacular 18% comparable same-store sales gain. the stores last year, they beat them by 18%. the best i've seen from any company that has hit my eyes in the last three months. by the way, that's coupled with some terrific gross margins. it looked like it was enough to send the stock to the low 70s instantly from the high 60s before it reported. but the downbeat high single-digit comp store projections, mentioned later in the earnings release, stopped the elf in its tracks, reversed it, and the stock dropped to the mid 60s almost instantly, again, all before the market was open. and there it lay until the conference call began. on that call you realized very quickly five things about lulu that no other company has. first the runw
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